The Canadian Alternative: Canadian Cartoonists, Comics, and Graphic Novels
A volume of essays
Deadline for completed papers: 30 April 2015

For a proposed edited and refereed volume on Canadian graphic novelists and cartoonists. Dominick Grace and Eric Hoffman, editors of Dave Sim: Conversations, Chester Brown: Conversations, and Seth: Conversations for the University Press of Mississippi, are editing a collection of essays provisionally titled The Canadian Alternative: Canadian Cartoonists, Comics, and Graphic Novels. We seek previously unpublished essays addressing Canadian cartoonists/comics. Our primary interest is in "alternative" cartoonists and cartooning, narrowly defined; that is, figures associated with the underground, independent, and/or ground-level comics movements. Figures of key interest might include but are not limited to:
Marc Bell
David Boswell
Chester Brown
David Collier
Julie Doucet
Rand Holmes
Jeff Lemire (especially his independent work)
Bernie Mireault
Bryan Lee O'Malley
Dave Sim
Seth

However, and as the inclusion of Lemire above indicates, we are also interested in papers dealing with the Canadian "alternative" more broadly-defined, whether represented by the visions of specific creators who have worked in mainstream comics (Byrne, Dan and Gene Day, Lemire, McFarland, etc.) or by Canadian alternatives to mainstream US comics publishing (e.g. the Canadian "whites" of World War Two), the various attempts to create a Canadian market/national hero (perhaps best represented by Richard Comely and Comely Comics's Captain Canuck), and other distinctly Canadian takes on the graphic medium (e.g. Martin Vaughan-James's The Cages, or BP Nicholls's use of comics/cartooning). Substantial essays (5,000-8,000 words) focusing on specific creators, comparing/contrasting the work of a few creators, or addressing Canadian movements in comics are welcome. Submit completed papers by April 30 2015 to Dominick Grace (dgrace2@uwo.ca) and/or Eric Hoffman (diamondjoecity@gmail.com). Inquiries/proposals are also welcome.
Though a publisher has yet to be determined, the University Press of Mississippi has expressed interest in publishing this collection.
(posted 9 September 2014)



Rethinking Hegemony and Domination in Translation
Special Issue of Target - International Journal of Translation Studies
Deadline for proposals: 30 April 2015

Guest edited by Stefan Baumgarten and Yan Ying (Bangor University, Wales, UK), and Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (Glasgow University)

Rationale
While there is no doubt that the 'ideological' and 'power turn' have reshaped the discipline of Translation Studies, much work still needs to be done in order to fully understand the ontological and epistemological underpinnings of the impact of ideology and power on the theory and practice of translation. The rapidly changing technological and corporate landscape in which translation theorists and practitioners find themselves immersed makes it necessary to keep exploring issues of power through sustained interdisciplinary engagement with other fields, such as the social sciences, critical philosophy or political science. Despite an increasing awareness of the impossibility of value-free research or practice, there appears to be a certain lack of self-reflection on our own entanglement within contemporary power structures. Structures which, in the apparent absence of an alternative to the current global capitalist orthodoxy, are largely driven by financial, economic and technological forces. With a view to opening a new debate on questions of hegemony and domination in relation to translation, this special issue aims to gather cutting-edge and cross-disciplinary research. By encouraging contributors to rethink the impact of power and ideology on the theory and practice of translation as well as on their own critical reflections, we welcome proposals dealing with contemporary political, sociocultural, (eco)linguistic, financial-economic and technological aspects of translation. The main aim of this special issue is to explore translation as a phenomenon caught in the conflicting forces of individual subjectivities, cross-cultural asymmetries, hegemonic values and the tensions between market-driven and customer-centric approaches.

Papers could focus on any of the following themes and aspects
Towards a (critical) theory of ideology and power relations in translation
- The legacy of the ‘cultural’ and ‘power’ turns
- New critical insights into the concepts of power and ideology and their relevance to translation theory
- Technoscience and posthumanism: a new turn in Translation Studies?
Power and ideology in the translation industry
- Ideological effects of technological change on translation theory and practice
- The social and ideological impact of translation technology
- Neoliberalism and technological rationalization
Politics, policy making and translation
- (Neo)imperialism after postcolonialism
- Symbolic violence, heteroglossia and (linguistic) imperialism
- Translation (technology) as a tool for activism and resistance

Deadlines
- submission of 1-2 page proposal by 30 April 2015
- notification of acceptance of proposals by 31 May 2015
- submission of completed papers by 31 January 2016
- submission of revised papers by 31 August 2016
- publication date: March 2017

Submission
Articles will be 6000-8000 words in length in English. Paper proposals of 400-500 words as well as the first completed and final versions of papers should be sent directly by email to all the guest editors.
Detailed guidelines for papers are available at: https://benjamins.com/#catalog/journals/target/guidelines

Contacts
All inquiries should be sent to all the guest editors:
- Stefan Baumgarten (s.baumgarten@bangor.ac.uk);
- Jordi Cornellà-Detrell (jordi.cornella@glasgow.ac.uk);
- Yan Ying (y.ying@bangor.ac.uk).
(posted 11 December 2014)



British autobiography in the 20th and 21st centuries
A book to be published in anglistik und englischunterricht (Winter Verlag Heidelberg)                                                                   

Deadline for proposals 30 April 2015

To be published in anglistik & englischunterricht (Winter Verlag Heidelberg)                                                                   

Autobiographies are among the bestselling books in Britain, as, for example, two out of the first ten from Waterstone's list of bestselling books are autobiographies (Dec. 2014). Other forms of autobiographical expression outside the traditional book format flourish as well. But while a number of publications dedicated to the study of American autobiography have recently come out, substantial collections of critical perspectives on twentieth and twenty-first century British autobiography have been rare. For such a volume, to be published in the series anglistik und englischunterricht in 2016, we invite both case studies and survey articles addressing a variety of texts and aspects, including but not limited to the following:
• Autobiography as a 'high' cultural (literary, artistic etc.), 'mid-brow' and 'low' cultural (popular, celebrity etc.) form in Britain
• Observations on genre developments and trends in British life writing; 'marginal' autobiographical forms
• Autobiographical expression in film, TV and the various new media such as blogs
• British archives of autobiographical statements, and their uses
• Autobiography, (British/European/colonial) history and memory
• Complexity and fluidity of constructions of identities (British, Welsh, gender, class, age etc.)
• Functions of paratextual elements
• The marketing of autobiographical texts
• The reception of autobiographical texts
• (Examples of) Uses of autobiography in the teaching of English language, culture and literature (considering both the production and interpretation of autobiographical texts in educational contexts)

Please send a proposal of 300 words to:
- Prof. Dr. Gabriele Linke, University of Rostock (gabriele.linke@uni-rostock.de)
- and Dr. Sarah Herbe, University of Salzburg (sarah.herbe@sbg.ac.at)
Deadline: 30 April 2015.
Final manuscripts will be due by 31 December 2015.
(posted 26 January 2015)



Salience and Relief-Related Discourse
Journal of Alpine Geography
Deadline for proposals: 15 May 2015

Salience is a term of Latin origin and has recently been adapted to French "saillance" in the field of linguistics where it generally refers to any phenomenon of emphasis. It is precisely because the mountains are by nature salient objects of geography that we would like to bring closer the two disciplines of discourse analysis (and picture analysis) and Alpine geography through the concept of salience.
The perception of the Alpine Arch has undergone a great evolution since the end of the 18th century, especially thanks to travellers visiting from Britain. Scientists, sportspeople, artists and writers have in turn visited the Alps for more than two centuries. The way they have looked upon the Alps has greatly contributed to change the way we look at the mountains. Under their quill, the once terrifying mountains were to become a place of beauty and awe (Bätzing and Rougier, Les Alpes : un foyer de civilisation au cœur de l’Europe: 2005). Mountains thenceforth began to host more and more diverse visitors whose stay or passage in the Alps contributed in their turn to change their physical, human or social geography, among other aspects. Geographers Bätzing and Rougier (2005) have also highlighted the role played by the perception of foreigners whose daily environment does not display such imposing geographical relief as the Alps. The novelty of this range of landscapes in their eyes is transcribed in their discourse by bringing into relief traits which Alpine peoples no longer notice with such surprise or novelty.
Whether it issues from the very nature of the object referred to as salient; from the place of this object in its environment or from the inherent characteristics of the subject who experiences it (cf.: the categories of salience, Landragin: 2011), salience has become an important theme of research in linguistics. Various schools of linguistics have already issued publications on salience (Landragin: 2004, 2011, Haude, Montaut: 2012, Inkova: 2011, Boisseau: symposium in Strasburg in 2010: to be published). The aim of these works which explore various languages is to issue a more precise definition of salience and to point out the forms salience may take in language. Eventually this will help precise what this concept can bring to discourse analysis. Finally, Landragin suggests extending the use of the notion to other disciplines to which it can bring a new insight (cf. Landragin's parallel between salience in photography and in narrative discourse: 2011).

This project more largely revolves around a questioning of how relief is framed in discourse through tools of pragmatics. Discourse construction will be analysed from the point of view of linguistics in its broadest sense. Authors are thus invited to produce articles on the forms and structures inherent to a language (certain structures may be common to different languages). Texts can be approached through cognitive linguistics and/or enunciation linguistics. Authors may also explore the stylistic aspect of relief in texts, that is to say, the framing of poetic discourse or the uncommon use of certain recurrent linguistic/discursive forms that literally "throw the perceived object into relief" and make a mountain out of it. In this stylistics perspective, it will also be interesting to examine how the relation between the enunciator and their speech on relief is constructed. Which viewpoint is adopted (narrative focus in narratology / modality in linguistics)? Finally, we will welcome articles delving into rhetoric to find out how esthetic and poetic forms single out the shaping of discourse on relief.
Authors of these analyses will seek to bring the relation between discourse analysis and the definition of the mountains to the forefront and, more largely, of relief according to the enunciator’s perception which will be put in the perspective of what they are used to seeing in their environment. This is precisely why texts in foreign languages are particularly interesting. The roof of Great Britain (Ben Nevis in Scotland) being 1344m high, one can expect from the alienage of the British traveller’s perception the emergence of linguistic and discursive forms that undoubtedly heighten to a higher degree the distinction of traits proper to reliefs and depressions. Language creativity will also be requested to face the challenge of putting into words what one has never seen or that is not yet part of a given linguistic landscape. For example, one could compare the means English has to put the sea and the seashore into words with what English has to put the mountains into words.
Later on, once the mountain has been explored, it partakes of the horizon of expectations of the traveller seeking to discover it. The travel writer or the artist, the geographer, the sociologist or the anthropologist goes to the mountains in quest of what they already know of them and what attracted them there (Ruskin's texts are very interesting in this respect).
Salience-related phenomena have long interested specialists of physical geography, (the word "saillance" is not used by geomorphologists in French); these phenomena have even become the core object of study in geomorphology (Le Cœur: 1996). In human geography, salience has been approached in various ways. For years, it has been seen as a fact observed from the point of view of both constraint and opportunity (Géneau de Lamarlière and Staszak 2000). In cultural geography, salience is rather approached from the point of view of construction. Indeed, in so far as it conveys values, stirs the imagination and enhances practice, language contributes to the construction of our representations of reality (Debarbieux 2007) and thus contributes to the construction of the mountain as an individualized object (Debarbieux and Rudaz 2010). Moreover, Raffestin (1995) based the epistemology of a branch of geography on the grounds of language/territory links.

Proposed themes (not exhaustive).
We here propose to explore the representation of the Alps and of other massifs in texts of all natures from the end of the 18th century to the present day.
- Seeking to analyse the representation of the mountain, authors may choose from travel narratives or works of fictions of all genres or even press articles (guides, mountain journals, etc.), geography schoolbooks. School textbooks and specialised journals could for instance be compared with their counterparts in other languages. Beyond English studies, the analyses of texts in any language other than French and English are welcome. How can the notion of salience in linguistics be put in relation with relief related discourse? How can intrinsically salient elements of discourse (linguistic marks, rhetorical forms…) contribute to the construction of the discourse on the mountain and how do they single it out? To what degree does the subject who takes charge of their speech redefine salience in their perception and representation of the mountain? Authors may also compare speeches about the same place produced by different authors.

- Beyond discourse as a mode of representation, authors may produce articles on iconographical representations of the mountain in which different methods to make a mountain out of a spatial object can be expected. How does the artist manage the use of canons? Do they need to diverge from them when they picture relief? Why and how do they proceed? What new methods do they use? In short, how does the mountain spur creativity in the structural sense of the term?

Deadline for proposals (500 words): May 15th 2015. Please include the following details: Surname, name, status, research group. Authors will get feedback as soon as possible. Proposals should be sent to:
- Samia Ounoughi (Anglophone studies AMU LERMA EA 853, UPMF Grenoble 2) <samia.ounoughi@upmf-grenoble.fr>
- Sylvie Duvillard (UPMF, CNRS PACTE-CNRS UMR5194 ) <sylvie.duvillard@upmf-grenoble.fr>
Final articles are expected in October 2015 in two versions: one is published in one of the Alpine languages (French, Italian, or German) or in Spanish; and the other version is published in English.
The issue will be published around June 2016.

The Journal of Alpine Geography is an international and multidisciplinary periodical. This journal publishes new scientific research concerning space and environment questions about the Alpine Arch and also about all mountains around the world. Researchers in all social sciences (geography, anthropology, sociology, history, political science, etc.) are invited to take part in this reflection about the mountain.
Articles are now published in two versions: one is version is published in one of the Alpine languages (French, Italian, or German) or in Spanish; and the other version is published in English. Our bilingual publication policy is intended to achieve broader exchanges and a wider spreading of ideas.
The JAR is widely referenced (to see detail: informations).
The journal celebrated its centenary in 2013 and all the articles are available online on: Persee.fr (1913-2006) and on rga.revues.org
(posted 11 March 2015)



Images of minority languages and identities
Poli-femo (IULM University, Milan)
Deadline for proposals: 30 May 2015

The journal Poli-femo (IULM University, Milan)  announces the call for papers for its next thematic issue on "Images of minority languages and identities".
We welcome articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:
• Construction of minority identities through translation
• Interlingual and intercultural translation of images of minority identities and languages
• Translation strategies and images of language and identity minorities
• Linguistic and cultural translation of language and identity minorities
• Language and identity pluralism and literary rules
• Images of minority identity and languages in the media
• Language and identity minorities and the role of institutions
Other related topics proposed by those who wish to collaborate in the volume will be seriously evaluated by the Scientific Committee, in order to expand the exploration undertaken in the current issue of the Journal.

Submission Guidelines.
If you are interested in contributing please submit an abstract (min. 10/max. 20 lines) and a short Curriculum Vitae by May 30th, 2015 to:
<redazione.polifemo@iulm.it>
Authors will be notified by June 15th, 2015 and each accepted paper will have to be submitted (in either Italian, English or French) by September 1st, 2015. Every article submitted to the journal will be subject to a double blind peer review.
The special issue will be edited by Prof. Paolo Proietti and published in December 2015.
You can read the call for papers here.
(posted 23 January 2015)



The Discourse of Clothing
Meridian critic
Deadline for article submission: 1 June 2015

The first 2015 issue of the academic journal Meridian critic invites scholarly articles which analyse and interpret the discourses concerning clothing. Beyond its protective and/or ornamental purpose or its role of ensuring the wearer's decency, clothing may indicate belonging (to an age group, a gender category, a certain place, a social milieu, an ethnic community, a religion, a trend of opinion, etc.), a change in status, a provocation, etc. Clothing is not just a form of self-expression, but also a way of communication. It is difficult, however, to conceive of the constitution of a dress code as a system of signification outside the linguistic code. The contributors to Meridian critic are invited to reflect on the forms, functions, values, and the reception of the discourses on clothing, approached from a literary and/or linguistic perspective, with possible additional insights from ethnology, sociology, anthropology, psychology, aesthetics, etc.

Lines of interest such as the following (but not only) may be explored:
• The particularities of the discourse of clothing in various textual genres (literary, scientific, religious, journalistic, etc.)
• Ideologies and literary trends reflected in the discourses on clothing;
• From description to argumentation in the discourse of clothing;
• The cultural specificity of discourses on clothing; their reflection of language-culture interactions;
• The dynamics of discourses on specific items of clothing;
• The lexic of discourses on clothing;
• Denotation and connotation in the discourse of clothing;
• Clothing: from image to discourse;
• From clothes to costume and viceversa through the discourse of clothing

Deadline for article submission: 1 June 2015.
We welcome papers in English, French, German, and Romanian.
Please send the abstracts (ca 200 words), the full paper (up to 7000 words), as well as a brief biographical note (ca 400 words) to the following address: <simonamanolache@litere.usv.ro>.
For details regarding style, please visit the following page: http://meridiancritic.usv.ro/index.php?page=instructions-to-authors

We also welcome book-length studies in the field of literature and linguistics, published in 2014, to be reviewed in our journal.
Please send the books to the following address: Meridian critic, Facultatea de Litere şi Ştiinţe ale Comunicării, Universitatea „Ştefan cel Mare” Suceava, Str. Universităţii nr. 13, 720229 Suceava, Romania
(posted 2 February 2015)



Thomas Aquinas' Theory of Conscience and Contemporary Debates on Conscientious Objection
Diametros - An Online Journal of Philosophy
Deadline for papers: 15 June 2015

The Editor of Diametros - An Online Journal of Philosophy invites papers on Thomas Aquinas' theory of conscience until 15th June 2015.

In particular, articles are welcome that feature such aspects of the theory as its admission of the possibility of erroneous judgments of conscience and its relation to recent controversies concerning conscientious refusals by health care professionals to take part in certain ethically contested medical procedures ("conscience clauses"). Other aspects of Aquinas’ theory of conscience, which merit an in-depth discussion, can also be dealt with.

Authors interested to contribute to this edition of Diametros, planned for publication in September 2015, are kindly requested to submit their proposals for double-blind peer review through the online platform of the journal:
(posted 14 October 2014)



Literature(s) as World Intertext(s)
Cultural Intertexts, academic journal of Literature and Cultural Studies
Deadline for proposals: 15 June 2015

Cultural Intertexts, academic journal of Literature and Cultural Studies, ISSN 2393-0624, E-ISSN 2393-1078, edited by the Department of English, Faculty of Letters, "Dunarea de Jos" University of Galati, Romania, with the support of the Doctoral School of Socio-Humanities and the Research Centre Interface Research of the Original and Translated Text - Cognitive and Communicative Dimensions of the Message, invites proposals of original articles, related to the general theme of the journal.
This year's issue focuses on Literature(s) as World Intertext(s).
The editors will consider for publication papers which tackle strategies of representation and of (inter)textual construction emerging from the dialogic relation between: literature and the historical and cultural context of text production, distribution and consumption; literature and other arts (music, film, visual arts, etc.) or sciences (linguistics, psycholinguistics, psychology, history, sociology and political sciences, internet and new technologies, etc.); creation and creator (autobiographic elements, metafictions, etc.).

Please send your proposals (title, abstract and 4-5 key words) to <oana.gheorghiu@ugal.ro< by June 15, 2015. Following preliminary acceptance, authors are expected to send their full-articles by June 30, 2015.
Every manuscript is single-blind peer-reviewed by two senior researchers or academics. The authors will be notified of the editorial decision in maximum 30 days. The new issue (3/ 2015) is scheduled to appear in September 2015.

The journal is indexed in EbscoHost, Fabula, Google Scholar and Scipio. Cultural Intertexts provides open access to its peer-reviewed contents through these databases and on the journal's website, http://cultural-intertexts.webnode.com
Also, Cultural Intertexts appears in print at Casa Cărții de Știință, a renowned publishing house located in Cluj-Napoca, Romania.
Publication fee (covers the printed volume and worldwide shipping): € 30.
(posted 10 Aprim 2015)



Interactions between Literature and Advertising
A Special Issue of Interférences Littéraires / Literaire Interferenties: A Multilingual e-Journal of Literary Studies
Deadline for proposals: 15 June 2015

Advertising draws upon literary culture in many ways: it borrows quotations for its slogans, enlists the services of aspiring and established writers and, more in generally, it uses many stylistic and rhetorical practices from the literary toolbox to ensnare customers and consumers. Far from being a new development, these practices can be traced back to the nineteenth century.
In literary criticism, however, this commercial borrowing of literature has not received a lot of attention. If the interactions between literature and advertising are studied at all, it is mostly with regard to the uses of advertising strategies and slogans in literary, especially modernist, texts. Yet, this special issue of Interférences Littéraires / Literaire Interferenties seeks to address the interaction between literature and advertising in both ways. It aims to investigate both how advertising uses literature in a variety of ways, and how literature integrates advertising elements in its texts. It will address such questions as:
- How does advertising integrate literary symbols in its 'brand culture'?
- How have texts, quotes, references, literary forms, or author figures circulated in literary texts since the nineteenth century?
- How does literature use, while at the same time distancing itself from, advertising?
In short, we aim to investigate the different aspects and problems at stake in the historical interactions of literature and advertising, so as to enable a better comprehension of their respective place within cultural practices.
On the one hand, this will allow us to situate literature within global culture, to outline its insertion in media practices, its institutional dimension, and its reception.
On the other hand, this will lead to a better understanding of advertising strategies as well as of the way in which advertising recycles, colonizes or acculturates materials stemming from other domains.

We welcome contributions which propose to approach these concerns from an interdisciplinary angle, combining literary history with the history of publicity, or the history of culture and discourse analysis, as well as comparative approaches involving different national and/or linguistic spaces.
The articles may be written in English, Dutch, French, German, Spanish or Italian and should be between 5000 and 8000 words (footnotes included).
Proposals are to be sent before June 15, 2015 to:
- Myriam Boucharenc <mboucharenc@sfr.fr>,
- Laurence Guellec <laurence.guellec@parisdescartes.fr<,
- David Martens <david.martens@kuleuven.be>
- and Françoise Galle <fgalle63gmail.com>.
They should contain an abstract of approximately 300 words, in addition to a short biography that indicates the institution you are affiliated to as well as your research interests.
The selection of the proposals will be concluded on June 30.
The final versions of the articles are to be sent, by e-mail, before September 30, 2015. Two experts will evaluate your articles.
The issue is set to be published in February 2016.
(posted 1 May 2015)



The conceptualisation of number in the English lexicon
Lexis, issue 10
Deadline for proposals: June 2015

The e-journal Lexis is planning to publish its 10th issue, devoted to ‘the conceptualisation of number in the English lexicon’, in 2016. Main editor: Laure Gardelle (ENS de Lyon). The full call for papers for issue 10 is available at http://lexis.univ-lyon3.fr/spip.php?rubrique30

Number, understood here in a narrow sense as the contrast between 'one' and 'more than one', spontaneously conjures up a grammatical category, which in English distinguishes between the singular and the plural. For several theoretical frameworks, the main meaning of the singular is to refer to one entity, and that of the plural to refer to more than one [Corbett 2000: 4]. This is illustrated, for example, by the pair magazine / magazines. In  this case the plural is a feature which is expressed in discourse in the form of an inflection added to a minimal lexical form, which brings its own contribution to the denotation, viz. the value 'more than one'.
The concepts of 'one' and 'more than one', however, cut across the grammatical categories of singular and plural. This is what the present issue wishes to explore, in order to describe how ‘one’ and ‘more than one’ are conceptualised in the lexicon. We welcome contributions on the following topics (the list is non-exhaustive):
- lexical plurals: for a number of plural-only nouns, or pluralia tantum, it is impossible to break down the meaning into lexical meaning + 'more than one'. For instance, measles does not mean one measle + one measle [and so on]; despite the grammatical plural, the word denotes a single disease. Acquaviva [2008: 79] concludes that the plural conceptualises the referent as 'non simplex', but that its semantic value for a given noun depends on the way in which the lexical contents of that noun define 'one'. It could be interesting to study in greater detail the relationship between the lexical contents of a noun and the semantic contribution of grammatical number. Acquaviva’s conclusion also calls for parallel studies of singular mass nouns (singularia tantum).
- collective nouns, aggregates and other nouns denoting internal plurality:  linguistic tradition isolates nouns such as family or crockery, which, even when they are grammatically singular, denote a plurality of elements. These nouns all present a double level of conceptualisation: a whole made up of multiple units. More recent studies, however, point out a variety of modes of conceptualisations among those nouns, which could be explored further. For instance, some collective nouns show more permeability than others, in the sense that their attributes are more easily inherited by the units which compose the whole. For example, a young pair implies young people, whereas a young organisation does not imply young members [Joosten et al. 2010]. Some collective nouns group the units together on the basis of spatial contiguity (e.g. pile), others on the basis of temporal contiguity (e.g. succession), and so on [Arigne 2006, 2011]. Papers on the metaphorical use of collective nouns (e.g. an army of business consultants) are also welcome. For instance, Flaux and Van de Velde [2010: 60] show that in French, such collective nouns in determinative uses convey a sense effect of quantity and that they are less sensitive to grammatical number, in the sense that un escadron d’élèves (lit. a squadron of pupils), for example, can denote the same number of pupils as des escadrons d’élèves (squadrons of pupils). The plural mainly has an emphatic role.
- more generally, the use of nouns followed by of will be of interest (e.g. a bit of): for instance, Huddleston and Pullum [2002: 349-350] show that deal requires a singular, uncountable noun to its right (a great deal of work, vs. *a great deal of errors), whereas for some speakers, amount or quantity now license a plural to their right. It could be interesting to study the conceptualisation operated by those nouns in relation to the notions of 'one' and 'more than one'.
- the relationship between grammatical number and massification or abstraction: some nouns denoting aggregates have a massifying effect (e.g. the French noun valetaille), or an abstracting effect in the case of hyperonyms -- such as jewellery, which Wierzbicka [1988] terms a 'collective supercategory'. Similar effects might also occur in discourse, with noun phrases such as all that succession and repetition of massed humanity. Another case is that of morphological plurals, which do not guarantee that the entity denoted by the noun can be counted (e.g. *he counted the furnishings, [Acquaviva 2008: 87]). In this sense, the conceptualisation conveyed by such a noun is the result of a process of abstraction.
- some nouns are morphologically invariable, either systematically so (e.g. sheep) or only in contexts of hunting or conservation (e.g. elephant) ([Allan 1976], [Corbett 2000]). It could be interesting to study the relationship between the lack of plural morphology and the conceptualisation of the animal, taking the variety of cases into account -- Allan shows that some nouns are more likely than others to have no final -s in these contexts (e.g. hyena vs. teal).
- the place of prefixes in the conceptualisation of number: for instance, Richet [2005] shows that one language might consider an element as 'more than one', via a multiplying prefix (e.g. quadruple croche in French), while another will make it a fraction of 'one' (e.g. hemidemisemiquaver). This phenomenon again calls for further study of the factors at play in the conceptualisation of a unit.
- recategorisation effects: the way an element is perceived might lead to a change in the grammatical behaviour of the corresponding noun. This is the case for instance with 'unit plurals' [Corbett 2000], such as coffees vs. (some) coffee, for which sensitivity to grammatical number is a consequence of the change in the conceptualisation of the entity. It could be interesting to study the limits of this correspondence, in standard language as well as in creative uses.

References
Acquaviva, Paolo. Lexical Plurals: A Morphosyntactic Approach. Coll. Theoretical Linguistics. Oxford: Oxford UP, 2008.
Allan, Keith. Collectivizing. Archivum Linguisticum 7, 1976: 99-117.
Arigne, Viviane. Les discrets collectifs face aux massifs: des modes de discrétisation du massif (version longue). In Jean-Claude Souesme (dir.), Le qualitatif, Cycnos 23:1, 2006. <http://revel.unice.fr/ >
Arigne, Viviane. La figure du tout intégré et les noms discrets collectifs. Anglophonia 30, 2011: 59-99.
Corbett, Greville G. Number. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000.
Flaux, Nelly & Danièle Van de Velde. Les noms en français: esquisse de classement. Paris: Ophrys, 2000.
Huddleston, Rodney & Geoffrey K. Pullum. The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2002.
Joosten, Frank et al. Dutch Collective Nouns and Conceptual Profiling. Linguistics 45:1, 2007: 85-132.
<http://eprints.soton.ac.uk/144837/1/Joosten,_De_Sutter,_Drieghe_et_al._(2007).pdf>
Richet, Bertrand. Des chiffres et des lettres : expression(s) du nombre en anglais contemporain. Cercles, 2005.
< http://www.cercles.com/occasional/ops2-2005/richet.pdf>
Wierzbicka, Anna. The Semantics of Grammar. Amsterdam: John Benjamins, 1988.

Manuscripts may be written in French or in English, and should be accompanied by an abstract of up to 10 lines in French and in English, as well as a list of the relevant key words. They should be sent to the Editor of Lexis <lexis@univ-lyon3.fr> as email attachments (Word and pdf), and will be refereed by two members of the international evaluation committee. Manuscripts may be rejected, accepted subject to revision, or accepted as such. There is no limit to the number of pages.
Abstracts and articles will be sent via email to <lexis@univ-lyon3.fr>.

Important dates:
• January 2015: call for papers
• June 2015: deadline for sending in abstracts to lexis
• September 2015: Evaluation Committee’s decisions notified to authors
• November 2015: deadline for sending in papers
• November-December 2015: proofreading of papers by the Evaluation committee
• January-February 2016: authors’ corrections
• March 2016: deadline for sending in final versions of papers.
(posted 29 January 2015)



Sustainable Language Learning in Higher Education
Researching and Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes, Volume XXXIV N°2 (June 2016)
Deadline for proposals: 30 June 2015

As recent European publications on lifelong learning suggest, the desire to make learning "sustainable", robust and resilient is at the heart of teaching languages in Higher Education, Languages for Specific Purposes and Languages for Academic Purposes. The English term "sustainability" implies the idea of a natural capital to be preserved, maintained, restored, managed or developed. The word "durabilité" is a recent import into French, and may be applied to teaching where tools and resources are provided with the aim of rendering the result and the process of learning permanent.
The term sustainability calls to mind the idea of ecology, especially as described by Bronfenbrenner (1979, 1994). In its broadest sense, ecology applies to individuals within an ecosystem and the interactions between them, however language use and language learning being social actions, the question of exchanges between communities is also unavoidable. Thinking of LSP/LAP in terms of ecology has implications at all levels, from the individual and his or her interaction within language communities to the evolution of language itself (ecolinguistics), microsystems (universities, families, etc.), macrosystems (culture, the economy, professional life, etc.).
Whereas the ideology of inbuilt obsolescence seems to be gaining ground in many areas of life, how can we think of learning and teaching languages in ways which will foster the development of durable skills so we can move towards inbuilt sustainability in Higher Education? This is the question which will be explored in the next volume of our journal Researching and Teaching Languages for Specific Purposes, to be published in June 2016.
http://apliut.revues.org/?lang=en

Key dates:
Deadline for proposals: 30 June 2015
Format of submissions : long abstract (3000 characters, spaces not included). The abstract will be completed by a few bibliographical references and sent in .doc or .docx format.
Please, also sent a short biography of the author.
See http://apliut.revues.org/1524 for more details
Please send your submission to:
<apliut@revues.org>
<linda.terrier@univ-tlse2.fr>
<julie.morere@univ-nantes.fr>
<nicole.forster@iut-tlse3.fr>
Notification of acceptance of submissions: 15 July 2015
Deadline for submitting the full-length articles: 30 September 2015

Recommendations for article submission: If the submission is deemed relevant for the volume, the author will be invited to submit his/her article according to the following instructions: http://apliut.revues.org/1965
Articles will be accompanied by two abstracts of approximately 150 words each, one in French and one in English or the language the article is written in, along with a list of a maximum of 8 key words in each of the two languages.

Two versions of the article should be submitted (in .doc or .docx format): an anonymous version and a non-anonymous one.
(posted 18 April 2015)



"Based upon a Life": The Biopic Genre in Question
LISA e-journal
Deadline for proposals: 1 July 2015

While George F. Custen defines a biopic (biographical film) as a depiction of "the life of a historical person, past or present" (Bio/Pics, How Hollywood Constructed Public History, 1992, p. 5), he also considers the impact of celebrities and stars as "key historical figures" whose public persona may interfere with the genre’s historical discourse. More recently, Ellen Cheshire has asked if this "maligned and misunderstood genre" is, in reality, a genre of its own (Bio-Pics: A Life in Pictures, 2015, p. 3). Biopics have indeed sparked off a number of on-going debates, not merely due to their claims of veracity, but through their practice of gender politics, intertextuality, reflexivity, and their hagiographic roots capable of impacting the narrative modes, visual and discursive strategies perpetuated by contemporary "life stories" on screen.
In this issue of Revue LISA/LISA e-journal (http://lisa.revues.org/), we invite contributors to explore the various mechanisms, conventions and patterns underlying the construction of “exceptional destinies” on screen (cinema/television). Not only should we question the type of person chosen as subject for biopic portrayals, but we also aim to prompt reflection on the ideological discourse conveyed by the genre. Whether they relate the lives of men and women embroiled in politics (Alice Paul, Malcolm X, Rosa Parks, John F. Kennedy, etc.), or, as in the subcategory of artist biopics, those of emblematic creators (Ernest Hemingway, Truman Capote, Georgia O’Keeffe, Charles Pollock, Allen Ginsberg, Sylvia Plath, etc.), biopics seem to promote an image of society that highlights the achievements of exemplary individuals -- be they politically engaged or artistically acclaimed. Moreover, although relying on authentic sources (biographies, autobiographical accounts, historical narratives, documentaries, newspaper articles, etc.), biopics are often decried as a popular genre that constantly blurs the boundary between public and personal history, History- and storytelling.
We call for papers that examine the ongoing mutations of this problematic film genre which Tom Brown and Belén Vidal qualify as “troublesome” in The Biopic in Contemporary Film Culture (2014). While the genre provides a number of filmic portrayals of heads of state and other well-known political figures, some biopics actually challenge historical facts by drawing attention on minority figures whose struggle for identity and political rights receives a positive treatment (Iron Jawed Angels, Harvey Milk, Sally Hemings: An American Scandal, 12 Years a Slave, etc.). Despite its tendency to set up ideals, the biopic does not seem to freeze History, but digs into the flaws of existing portraits and texts, exploring the problematic relationship between the viewed object and the looking subject.

Some possible avenues of research may include:
- The impact of the biographed characters over the chosen narrative structures and filming strategies (Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln, Theodore Roosevelt, John Reed, JFK, Richard Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover, George W. Bush, Henry VIII, Mary Queen of Scots, Queen Victoria, Charles Darwin, Florence Nightingale, Lawrence Of Arabia, Elizabeth I, Elizabeth II, Henry V, etc.)
- Biopic codes and conventions and the world of business and industry (Preston Tucker, Jimmy Hoffa, Howard Hughes, Steve Jobs, Jordan Belfort, etc.)
- Writers (William Shakespeare, Jane Austen, C. S. Lewis, Iris Murdoch, Virginia Woolf, Fitzgerald), artists and stars representing the world of music and showbiz (Billie Holiday, Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan, Loretta Lynn, Johnny Cash, Ray Charles, Tina Turner, James Brown, John Lennon, Louis Valdez, etc.) and cinema (Oscar Micheaux, Charles Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock, Howard Hughes, Marilyn Monroe, Ed Wood, etc.)
- The singular careers of sportsmen (Jake Lamotta, Babe Ruth, Muhammed Ali, Mike Tyson, Jim Brown, Chariots of Fire, etc.) and of killers raised to fame thanks to the media (Al Capone, John Dillinger, Bugsy Siegel, etc.).
- Repetition and variation, canonization and subversion within the biopic treatments of historical truth.
- Hybridization of the biopic genre (for instance) with animation films (Superstar: The Karen Carpenter Story, 1989); the blending of the historical with the fantastic (Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter, 2012).
- Biographical films and censorship.
- The role of biopics in promoting public debates on social issues, especially regarding questions of gender, race and class.
- The biopic canon in the era of mass entertainment and commercial imperatives: epic quests or post-mortem tributes of a new kind?
- The relationship between biopic and star/celebrity studies.

Proposals not exceeding 500 words and including a short biographical notice should be addressed by July 1, 2015 to:
- Delphine Letort (Delphine.Letort@univ-lemans.fr)
- and Taïna Tuhkunen (Taina.Tuhkunen@univ-angers.fr).
Completed essays will be due November 15, 2015.
(posted 27 February 2015)



Representing Heroes and Villains Across Time and Space (tentative title)
A book edited by Professor Leo J Loveday
Deadline for proposals: 1 September 2015

Editor: Professor Leo J Loveday, Dept. of English, Doshisha University, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto, 602-8580 Japan.
The editor's previous publications include: Contextual Identities: A Comparative and Communicational approach (co-editor with E.Parpala Cambridge Scholars Press (forthcoming, 2015); Language Contact in Japan. (Oxford University Press, 1996) and The Sociolinguistics of Learning and Using a Non-native Language (Pergamon Press, 1982) among others.

Call for Papers: 5,000 words
Heroes and villains constitute archetypal figures in every culture and have fired the human imagination ever since story-telling began. This collection of case-studies sets out to explore how different works of literary art portray their personages in ways which allow us to identify such archetypal qualities. Above all, the main focus is on the symbolic means employed to paint a character as a hero (heroine) or villain(ess). The perspective is multidisciplinary and brings together the insights of linguists, semioticians and researchers into literary and cultural studies and stylistics. The texts under scrutiny may come from different cultures and times and may include genres as diverse as, for instance, novels, drama, poetry, children's literature, fairy tales or mythology.

Of particular relevance are the following themes and issues:
- How is the speech of the characters constructed to contribute to their archetypal delineation? What kind of linguistic devices, strategies, features, speech acts etc. are employed to mark the hero or villain?
- Is there (hidden) linguistic symbolism used to communicate something about the characters? i.e. their names, the locations they move in? e.g. the name of the female central character, Blanche DuBois in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire, alludes to the purity and innocence of the color white (> "blanche" in French).
- How does their behavior represent, embody, challenge or subvert a particular moral stance?
- What symbolic (semiotic) resources apart from dialog and action does the artist exploit and to what effects do they echo or earmark the archetype? e.g. colors, objects, human physical features, phenomena from nature etc. e.g. the physically abused bull terrier belonging to Bill Sykes in Oliver Twist.
- How does the tool of metaphor (imagery) contribute to archetypal moulding? e.g. Rochester in Jane Eyre is associated with birds of prey.
- What are the expectations (schemata) concerning a hero and villain that can be inferred from the work and how are they related to the particular cultural and historical context of its producer? To what extent are they fulfilled?
- How does the artist make an anti-hero different from the conventional model?
- What is the underlying psychological mapping that resonates with the social psyche of the audience? e.g. a Cinderella or Messiah model? On the other hand, is the villain a fundamental coward, abuser or corruptor? How is this profiling artistically crafted & symbolised?
- Is simplistic, antithetical categorization inapplicable to your case-study? e.g. Odysseus is both a trickster (with his Trojan horse subterfuge) and a hero; does the character morph between the states of hero and villain?

If you are interested in contributing, please send an abstract of around 200 words to the following email address:
<lloveday@mail.doshisha.ac.jp>
together with details about your academic background and previous publications by 1. September 2015.
NOTE: Submissions must be original and not have been previously published or currently under consideration for publication. Manuscripts must be written in English and will be required to follow the guidelines of the publisher. (This project is now in the conception stage and it is planned that the papers will appear with a reputable publisher in the UK.) Do not embark on your chapter until your proposal has been formally accepted.
(posted 2 April 2015)



The myths of yesterday and the myths of today. From Barthes to Maffesoli
Poli-femo (IULM University, Milan, Italy)
Deadline for proposals: 1 October 2015

We welcome articles that focus on, but are not limited to, the following topics:
The topics that can be presented include:
• Myth and time (the myth of memory, myth and memory);
• Myth and (common)place;
• Myth, individual and/or collective desire;
• Myth and the great paradigms of history;
• The process of mythopoeia between repetition and originality;
• Myth and literary analysis (thematology and mythocriticism);
• Myth as a tool for conscience and knowledge.
Other related topics proposed by those who wish to collaborate in the volume will be seriously evaluated by the Scientific Committee, in order to expand the exploration undertaken in the current issue of the Journal.

Submission Guidelines:
If you are interested in contributing please submit an abstract (min. 10/max. 20 lines) and a short Curriculum Vitae by October 1st, 2015 to:
 <redazione.polifemo@iulm.it>.
Authors will be notified by October 19th, 2015 and each accepted paper will have to be submitted (in either Italian, English or French) by February 1st, 2016.
All contributions will be subject to a double blind peer review.

The special issue will be edited by Prof. Fabio Vittorini and Dr. Andrea Chiurato and published in June 2016.

The full call for papers is available here.
(posted 18 May 2015)


Debating the Afropolitan
An issue of volume 21 of EJES
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2015

The editors of EJES are issuing calls for papers for the three issues of the journal to be published in 2017. Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates in a two-stage review process, the first based on detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words), and the second on full essays. The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 October 2015, with delivery of completed essays by 31 March 2016.

Guest editors:  Emilia María Durán-Almarza (Oviedo), Carla Rodríguez González (Oviedo), Ananya J. Kabir (King’s College London).

In her 'Bye-Bye, Babar (Or: What is an Afropolitan?)' (2005), Taiye Selasi introduced the term 'Afropolitan' as a coinage that aims at capturing the embodied experiences of a younger generation of African diasporic subjects living in contemporary world cities. Since then, the term has been claimed by many who have identified themselves with the realities Selasi depicts in her essay, while it has also been challenged by others for its alleged class, racial, and ethnic bias, and even by its purported complicity with cultural commodification processes. In the light of these debates, the issue will explore Afropolitanism as a framework for the analysis of contemporary phenomena affecting those subjects and subjectivities that emerge at the intersections of African and urban materialities. It will do this by examining a variety of cultural, linguistic and literary expressions of Afropolitan populations of the post-1960s generations in European contexts. We seek contributions that analyse the complex interactions of race, ethnicity, gender, class, or age in the formation of contemporary Afro-diasporic subjectivities, as well as their intersections with spatial/material issues. Topics might include but are not limited to:
• Configurations of Afro-diasporic materialities in contemporary cultural representations
• Challenges and alternatives to ‘Afropolitanism’: theories, politics, identities
• Socio-economic, cultural and emotional networks in the (re)production of Afro-diasporic identities and identifications
• Intersections of gender, post-/ de-colonial and urban/spatial studies
• Afropolitan performances: drama, rhythms, visualities, discourses and styles
• Literary, linguistic and performative (re)creations of Afro-diasporic materialities
• The Afropolitan as a ‘cosmopolitan’ figure: challenges and potential
Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to all three editors:
More information about EJES.
(posted 27 January 2015)



Feminist Interventions in Intermedial Studies
An issue of volume 21 of EJES
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2015

The editors of EJES are issuing calls for papers for the three issues of the journal to be published in 2017. Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates in a two-stage review process, the first based on detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words), and the second on full essays. The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 October 2015, with delivery of completed essays by 31 March 2016.

Guest editors:  Anna Kérchy (Szeged) and Catriona McAra (Leeds College of Art)

This issue seeks to explore intermedial interactions between literary and visual representations of the female body. Disrupting the contours of discipline and medium, the feminist project has radicalised text/image relationships in myriad ways, working with both contemporary examples and re-readings of the past. In the tradition of empowering marginalised other(ed) perspectives, Feminist Interventions in Intermedial Studies will seek to promote new methodological approaches that, going beyond the simple context of hegemonic domination, perform an interdisciplinary union of semiotics and corporeal feminism, of literary theory and readings in visual arts, and of iconography and revisionary interpretations of literature. Papers might, for example, explore how the semioticisation of female bodies affects the somatisation of texts and images; or offer a gender-sensitive analysis of topics like the role of illustrations, pictures collaged inside literary texts, the figurativeness of lyrical language, or the rhetorics of visual culture. We particularly welcome essays that deal with intermedial body politics in connection with the critique or negotiation of Englishness or of ideas and representations of Europe within Anglophone cultures and contexts.
Topics might include but are not limited to:
• Feminist practices, aesthetics and collectives
• Artists/writers who use literature/art in gendered ways
• Body Art/body politics
• Corporeal narratology/Corpusemiotics
• Feminist treatments of intermedial theory
• Gender-conscious narrative/poetical reinterpretations of ekphrasis, hypotyposis, synesthesia, iconotext, paratext, etc.
• The embodied reader/spectator and feminine subjectivity
• Feminist embodiments of analogue/electronic transmissions of knowledge
Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to both editors:
More information about EJES.
(posted 27 January 2015)



Getting and Spending
An issue of volume 21 of EJES
Deadline for proposals: 31 October 2015

The editors of EJES are issuing calls for papers for the three issues of the journal to be published in 2017. Potential contributors are reminded that EJES operates in a two-stage review process, the first based on detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words), and the second on full essays. The deadline for proposals for this volume is 31 October 2015, with delivery of completed essays by 31 March 2016.

Guest editors: Silvana Colella (Macerata), Brecht de Groote (Leuven), Frederik Van Dam Leuven)

Building on the achievements of the New Economic Criticism, literary critics have continued to expand our understanding of the many points of contact and separation between literature and economics. The present issue aims to push this established scholarship into new directions. It seeks to explore new approaches and methodologies and thus to shed light on some of the many connections between literary texts and, to use William Wordsworth's words, 'Getting and Spending'. While contributions are sought on literary and cultural texts from any historical period, the editors particularly welcome proposals that deal with the New Economic Criticism in European contexts.
Topics might include but are not limited to:
• The literary representation of economic concepts
• The translation, adaptation and retranslation of economic texts and motifs
• The image of the economist, industrialist or speculator in literature
• The image of the poet or artist in political economy
• Representations of 'economic women'
• Competing economic ideologies and their literary treatment: mercantilism, capitalism, socialism
• The rhetoric and poetics of economics: metaphor, anthropomorphism, ambiguity
• The ethics and aesthetics of economics: sympathy, trust, moral sentiments, consumption, desire
• Stereotypes in economic representation: intersections with nationalism, racism, anti-Semitism
• Literary responses to economic events
• Literary patronage
• The literary text as a commodity
Detailed proposals (up to 1,000 words) for essays of no more than 7,500 words, as well as all inquiries regarding this issue, should be sent to all three editors:
More information about EJES.
(posted 27 January 2015)



The (Female) Body: New Encounters/Readings in British Fiction
Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses
Deadline for the submission of manuscripts: December 2015

The Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses is preparing a special issue for Spring 2016: "The (Female) Body: New Encounters/Readings in British Fiction".
This is the first time our academic journal will dedicate a monographic number to these concerns pertaining to the female body and its overlapping, inter-disciplinary dimensions in contemporary British literature by women writers. Both guest editors teach English literature at the University of la Laguna and are members of the IUEM (Institute of Women's Studies of the University of La Laguna), and one of thier most cherished areas of attention lies in the continuous interest that 21st-Century approaches to the (female) body has shown, which unleashes a bulky body of questions, not only intent on pursuing the long raised issue of 'what is a body?' but also posing inquiries into a wide spectrum of aspects creeping into discourse. These may elaborate on representational rituals concerning how the body is presented and represented, or whether/what/how it represents us, the embodying of (self-)experience and (self-re)cognition, body (il)legibility, being-having-inhabiting a body, body control, bodily deviations and disabilities, aging bodies, corporeal discourses and its transformative potentials, literary bodies, imagined or virtual corporealities, body textualities and the engendering of the female body in literary genre..., to bring out but just a few.
Literary narrativizings of the female body have proved significantly responsive to its transformative potentials. This issue aspires to rethink the female body in contemporary British women's literature as a site of creative contesting of essentializing discourses which frequently inscribe their ideologies on gendered corporealities by presenting them as tangible, self-evident truths, usually (under)valued, circumvented or placed at the borderline of representation, knowledge, voice and agency in Western dominant discourses. Instead, these new proposals of literary stylizations of the female body aim at creative rewriting, remapped localities and empowered transgressions, which may include gender and trans-gender figurations, whether in canonic or popular literature, or genre typologies mutating "corporeally" as they break free from customary narrative legibility and open ground for new representations of the body and bodiliness in customary discourses about women’s bodies. We thus intend this issue to become a meeting point for your contribution within these suggested topics, or any other hopeful delineations of identity via the female body in British women’s literature.

The deadline for the submission of manuscripts would be by December 2015 (approximately 7500 or 8500 words, conforming to the latest MLA Style Manual guidelines) and the article would be submitted to the double blind-peered review system. Please, contact us for the guidelines for publication.

The Revista Canaria de Estudios Ingleses is published twice yearly, in April and November by the University of La Laguna. As of this year, RCEI will be published in an on-line version, following current trends in journal publication. It is scanned, indexed, or abstracted by the Annual Bibliography of English Language and Literature, Current Contents, Linguistics and Language Behavior Abstracts, MLA International Bibliography, and Ulrich's International Periodical Directory, among others. Authors may republish their own material, if such republication provides due acknowledgement.

For further inquiries  please write us to:
- <mapimont@ull.es> (Mª del Pino Montesdeoca Cubas)
- or <mchivite@ull.es> (Mª José Chivite de León).
(posted 24 April 2015)



Proto-Posthumanisms
Word and Text - A Journal of Literary Studies and Linguistics, VI (2016)
Deadline for proposals: 31 January 2016

Western thinkers have long been fascinated by the possibility of creating new forms of organic and inorganic life. In Plato, Homer and Aristotle we read of the living bronze and gold statues modelled by the master craftsman Daedalus and the divine blacksmith Hephaestus, while in Ovid's tales it is Pygmalion that fashions himself an ivory girl to love. Marking the beginnings of science fiction, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein imbues a patchwork monster with the breath of life, a fictional Thomas Edison creates what he believes to be the perfect female android in Tomorrow's Eve, and in Karel Čapek’s play from 1920, the Rossum factory churns out hundreds of thousands of robots that are indistinguishable from human beings. Influenced by Darwin’s revolutionary understanding of the notion of species and evolutionary change, other writers chose to turn their attention towards the human species itself and began to reflect on the possible evolution of the human into new forms of being. H.G. Wells contemplated the possible degeneration of man into creatures that descended from, but could no longer be recognised as, human, while in The Coming Race Edward Bulwer-Lytton created an elaborate fictional world in which mankind is succeeded by highly-technologised creatures whose capabilities far exceed those of Homo sapiens. In their dreams of extending the experience of human life to objects that were previously inanimate and in their portrayal of mankind as containing the germs of its own otherness, these texts disturb essentialist conceptions of the human and pre-empt our contemporary fascination with the figure of the posthuman.

Over recent decades several theorists have utilised the notion of the posthuman to describe a new phase in the history of humanity -- one that has evolved out of man’s extended relationship with technology. In her now famous ‘Cyborg Manifesto’, Donna Haraway describes a new form of life emerging out of the congress of man and machine; a “joint kinship” that defies the perceived boundaries between the organic and the inorganic, the human and the non-human. N. Katherine Hayles, meanwhile, argues that the human is being transformed into “an amalgam, a collection of heterogeneous components, a material-informational entity whose boundaries undergo continuous construction and reconstruction” (How we Became Posthuman). Under the banner of transhumanism, other thinkers have foretold of the coming of a technological singularity that will utterly transform the nature of the human species.

In distinction to these visions of the 'post' or 'after' of the human, a number of other theorists have chosen to use posthumanism to investigate more specifically how our perception of the human has been transformed and to recognise that what we have defined as human has always been inherently other. Whereas some theorists have chosen to write about a ‘post-’ to the human, others have sought to articulate what they conceive of as the 'post-' of humanism. Bringing these two positions together, the notion of the posthuman prompts us to think of that which comes 'after' the human or humanism, while also inviting us to look back upon the evolution of the human, of language and of technology, or, as Cary Wolfe describes it, "the prosthetic coevolution of the human animal with the technicity of tools and external archival mechanism […] all of which comes before that historically specific thing called "the human"" (What Is Posthumanism?).

Marked by a curious temporality, the posthuman "comes both before and after" (What Is Posthumanism?; my italics) the human and humanism and prompts us to look backwards and forwards to our past and our possible futures. The title of this journal issue adds one more layer to this temporal deferral, inviting contributors to think about how contemporary theories of the posthuman are pre-empted by philosophical, literary and scientific works from earlier periods. Contributors are invited to look back upon works from the past that project themselves into imagined futures, other past texts that in their old age reveal the germinal roots of a more contemporary understanding of the human, or perhaps contemporary texts that seek to inscribe the posthuman into our human past.

In one sense, then, this issue seeks to explore a genealogy of posthumanism, tracing its roots and origins into the past. In addition, however, it invites us to question the very notion of genealogy itself. The conflation of the two prefixes 'proto' and 'post' may be understood as an invitation to reflect more closely on how the temporal ambiguity opened up by our use of the term 'posthumanism' is inherent to any possible thinking of it. According to R. L. Rutsky, "the posthuman cannot simply be identified as a culture or age that comes 'after' the human, for the very idea of such a passage, however measured or qualified it may be, continues to rely upon a humanist narrative of historical change" ('Mutation, History and Fantasy in the Posthuman'). If one is to truly speak of -- or speak as -- the posthuman, then this must necessarily entail a new understanding of time and history. By drawing attention to the strange temporality of a 'post' that is always already a 'proto' -- and a 'proto' that is always already a 'post' -- the title to this issue urges us to rethink the very notions of human temporality, evolution, history and genealogy.

We invite contributions related, but not limited to, the following:
• Past literary, philosophical, religious and scientific texts that speak of the future of the human, the possibility of human obsolescence, or, indeed, the promise of a higher order of human being;
• Philosophical, literary and scientific works whose representation of the human pre-empts that of current posthumanist thought;
• Contemporary texts that seek to rewrite or reinterpret the past through the lens of posthumanism;
• Explorations of how the origins of the human species, of technology, and of language may be rethought through understandings of posthumanism;
• A rethinking of the notions of temporality, evolution, genealogy and history from the perspective of posthumanism.
We welcome interdisciplinary approaches, ranging across critical theory, literary and cultural studies, linguistics, as well as other disciplines in the humanities and the sciences. Contributors are advised to follow the journal’s submission guidelines and stylesheet. The deadline for abstract submission is January 31, 2016. Please send 1,000 word proposals to the editor of the volume who will answer any queries you may have. Articles selected for publication must be submitted by April 30, 2016. All submitted articles will be blind-refereed except when invited. Accepted articles will be returned for post-review revisions by June 30, 2016, and will be expected back in their final version by September 30, 2016 at the latest.
Proposals and articles should be sent as attachments to <wordandtext2011@gmail.com.>
(posted 25 March 2015)


Permanently Valid Calls for Papers



The Journal of Cultural Mediation

The Journal of Cultural Mediation of the SSML Fondazione Villaggio dei Ragazzi "don Salvatore d'Angelo" focuses on the role of culture in perceiving and translating reality. The aim of this Journal is to promote research in communication, especially by investigating language, languages, cultural models, mediation and interculturality, welcoming contributions focussing on cultural mediation in modern society.
In particular manuscripts should concern:
- The role of the cultural mediator
- Linguistic/cultural mediation teaching methodologies
- Cultural mediation and identity
- Linguistic mediation in specialized discourse
- Analysis of text translations
- Quality interpreting - Interpreting as cultural mediation
- Professionalization and professional issues of interpreters
- Interdisciplinarity within Interpreting Studies
- Teaching methodologies in interpreter training
- Research on any aspect of interpreting in any research paradigm (including cognitive science, psycholinguistics, neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics, applied linguistics, discourse analysis, pragmatics, anthropology, semiotics, comparative cultural studies, cross-cultural communication, etc.)

All papers submitted to The Journal of Cultural Mediation should be original, neither having been previously published nor being considered elsewhere at the time of submission.
Papers can be written in Italian, English, French, Spanish or German, they should not exceed 6000 words and should be preceded by an abstract of 200-250 words. If the language of the paper is not English, please include a translation of the abstract in English as well. At the head of your abstract please indicate the title of the proposal, the name of the author/s, affiliation and email address. Please include five to six keywords.
The editor will select contributions for each issue and notify authors of acceptance or otherwise according to the dates below.
Authors wishing to contribute to the Journal of Cultural Mediation are welcome to submit their abstracts as email attachments to:
 <jcm.ssmlmaddaloni@yahoo.it>

For further information, contributors are encouraged to read the guidelines of the journal, given on our website:
IMPORTANT DATES (Issue 1)
March 31st: call for abstracts
April 15th: notification of acceptance
June 15th: paper submission
IMPORTANT DATES (Issue 2)
September 30th: call for abstracts
October 15th: notification of acceptance
December 15th: paper submission
(posted 16 February 2012)



The Brontës and the Idea of Influence
A thematic dossier in the “Writers, writings” section of LISA e-journal

In March 2007, Stevie Davies, Patricia Duncker and Michele Roberts gathered around Patsy Stoneman at Haworth in Yorkshire to talk about the influence that the Brontës had had on their evolutions as authors, and more generally, about the source of inspiration that the most famous family of writers in England could represent. Patsy Stoneman had already tackled the topic by publishing a book entitled The Brontë Influence in 2004 with the help of Charmian Knight. The issue of LISA e-journal "Re-Writing Jane Eyre: Jane Eyre, Past and Present" is further evidence of Charlotte Brontë's influence on the writers of the following decades or centuries. So far, these studies have been quite limited and this field of research, "the Brontë influence", offers a wide range of possible developments.
Moreover, if the four authors' poetry and novels have already been the object of numerous studies, there is much left to write about the influences which were exerted on the Brontës, whether religious, literary, philosophical or cultural. Taking account of the context of  a work is often a good way of understanding the issues underlying a text: the path taken by the Brontës, their journeys, their stays abroad, the books they read, etc. could prove to be very enlightening. Besides these external factors, one could also consider the interactions between the three sisters, who wrote in the same room and who read passages from their works aloud.
A final aspect to identify and study could be the influences which are exerted within the Brontës' works themselves. How can one account for the progress of the heroes and heroines? How is the influence that characters have on one another expressed? What role does nature play in the destiny of characters? Which other elements intervene in the novels?

This dossier devoted to the Brontës intends to analyse the works through the perspective of influence and three different fields of research can thus be considered:
-    influences on the Brontës
-    the idea of influence in the Brontës’ works
-    the Brontë influence on the writers of the 19th, 20th and 21st centuries.
Please send your proposals (one A4 page maximum) to Dr. Élise Ouvrard <ouvrard_elise@hotmail.com>.
Accepted articles will be published in the thematic dossier "The Brontës and the Idea of Influence" on the website of LISA e-journal:
(posted 10 January 2008, updated 3 November 2010)



Controversy: Literary Studies and Ethics
JLT-Journal of Literary Theory online

Submissions are continuously accepted.
Are literary scholars and critics supposed to voice their view on normative questions within their academic writings? How far should world views, political opinions and evaluations enter into the scholarly and critical work with literary texts? Is it even possible to exclude such judgements from literary studies? How and why do different traditions of literary studies treat these problems divergently?

Submissions are expected to refer to previous contributions to this controversy by Peter J. Rabinowitz and Marshall W. Gregory, which can be found here:
and here:
Please contact the editorial office for further details at
<jlt@phil.uni-goettingen.de>.
(posted 10 February 2011)